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Yi Jing [I Ching]: The Book of Changes

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Hexagram 55

Fēng [Abundance (Fullness)]

    Original Translation
The Image   Both thunder and lightning come.
  Zhèn (The Arousing, Thunder) above, Lí (The Clinging, Fire) below.
The Judgment   Fēng intimates progress and development. When a king has reached the point (which the name denotes) there is no occasion to be anxious (through fear of a change). Let him be as the sun at noon.
 

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Fēng has the signification of being great. It is made up of the trigrams (representing) intelligence and movement directed by that intelligence. It is thus that it has that signification.

'The king has reached the condition (denoted by Fēng):'--he has still to make it greater. 'There is no occasion to be anxious. Let him be as the sun at noon:'--it is for him to cause his light to shine on all under the sky.

When the sun has reached the meridian height, it begins to decline. When the moon has become full, it begins to wane. The (interaction of) heaven and earth is now vigorous and abundant, now dull and scanty, growing and diminishing according to the seasons. How much more must it be so with (the operations of) men! How much more also with the spiritual agency!

 

(The trigrams representing) thunder and lightning combine to form Fēng. The superior man, in accordance with this, decides cases of litigation, and apportions punishments with exactness.
Line 1 1 The first NINE, undivided, shows its subject meeting with his mate. Though they are both of the same character, there will be no error. Advance will call forth approval.
  'Though they are both of the same character, there will be no error:'--if the subject of this line seek to overpass that similarity, there will be calamity.
Line 2 2 The second SIX, divided, shows its subject surrounded by screens so large and thick that at midday he can see from them the constellation of the Bushel. If he go (and try to enlighten his ruler who is thus emblemed), he will make himself to be viewed with suspicion and dislike. Let him cherish his feeling of sincere devotion that he may thereby move (his ruler's mind), and there will be good fortune.
 

'Let him cherish his feeling of sincere devotion, that it shall appear being put forth:'--it is by sincerity that the mind is affected.

Line 3 3 The third NINE, undivided, shows its subject with an (additional) screen of a large and thick banner, through which at midday he can see (the small) Mei star. (In the darkness) he breaks his right arm; but there will be no error.
 

'There is an (additional) screen of a large and thick banner:'--great things should not be attempted (in such circumstances). 'He breaks his right arm:'--in the end he will not be fit to be employed.

Line 4 4 The fourth NINE, undivided, shows its subject in a tent so large and thick that at midday he can see from it the constellation of the Bushel. But he meets with the subject of the (first) line, undivided like himself. There will be good fortune.
 

'He is surrounded by a screen large and thick:'--the position of the line is inappropriate. 'At midday he sees the constellation of the Bushel:'--there is darkness and no light. 'He meets with the subject of the line, undivided like himself. There will be good fortune:'--action may be taken.

Line 5 5 The fifth SIX, divided, shows its subject bringing around him the men of brilliant ability. There will be occasion for congratulation and praise. There will be good fortune.
 

'The good fortune indicated by the fifth SIX, (divided),'is the congratulation (that is sure to arise).

Line 6 6 The topmost SIX, divided, shows its subject with his house made large, but only serving as a screen to his household. When he looks at his door, it is still, and there is nobody about it. For three years no one is to be seen. There will be evil.
 

'He has made his house large:'--he soars (in his pride) to the heavens. 'He looks at his door, which is still, with no one about it:'--he (only) keeps himself withdrawn from all others.

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