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Yi Jing [I Ching]: The Book of Changes

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Hexagram 45

Cuì [Gathering Together (Massing)]

    Original Translation
The Image   Over the earth, the lake.
  Duì (The Joyous, Lake) above, Kūn (The Receptive, Earth) below.
The Judgment   In (the state denoted by) Cuì, the king will repair to his ancestral temple. It will be advantageous (also) to meet with the great man; and then there will be progress and success, though the advantage must come through firm correctness. The use of great victims will conduce to good fortune; and in whatever direction movement is made, it will be advantageous.
 

Cuì indicates (the condition of union, or) being collected. We have in it (the symbol of) docile obedience going on to (what is expressed by that of) satisfaction. There is the strong line in the central place, and rightly responded to. Hence comes the (idea of) union.

'The king will repair to his ancestral temple:'--with the utmost filial piety he presents his offerings (to the spirits of his ancestors). 'It will be advantageous to meet the great man, and there will then be prosperity and success:'--the union effected by him will be on and through what is correct. 'The, use of great victims will conduce to good fortune; and in whatsoever direction movement is made, it will be advantageous:'--all is done in accordance with the ordinances of Heaven.

When we look at the way in which the gatherings (here shown) take place, the natural tendencies (in the outward action) of heaven and earth and of all things can be seen..

 

(The trigram representing the) earth and that for the waters of a marsh raised above it form Cuì. The superior man, in accordance with this, has his weapons of war put in good repair, to be prepared against unforeseen contingencies.
Line 1 1

The first SIX, divided, shows its subject with a sincere desire (for union), but unable to carry it out, so that disorder is brought into the sphere of his union. If he cry out (for help to his proper correlate), all at once (his tears) will give place to smiles. He need not mind (the temporary difficulty); as he goes forward, there will be no error.

  'In consequence disorder is brought into the sphere of his union:'--his mind and aim are thrown into confusion.
Line 2 2 The second SIX, divided, shows its subject led forward (by his correlate). There will be good fortune, and freedom from error. There is entire sincerity, and in that case (even the small offerings of) the vernal sacrifice are acceptable.
  'He is led forward; there will be good fortune, and freedom from error:'--(the virtue proper to) his central place has not undergone any change.
Line 3 3 The third SIX, divided, shows its subject striving after union and seeming to sigh, yet nowhere finding any advantage. If he go forward, he will not err, though there may be some small cause for regret.
  'If he go forward, he will not err:'--in the subject of the topmost line there is humility and condescension.
Line 4 4 The fourth NINE, undivided, shows its subject in such a state that, if he be greatly fortunate, he will receive no blame.
  'If he be grandly fortunate, he will receive no blame:'--(this condition is necessary, because) his position is not the one proper to him.
Line 5 5 The fifth NINE, undivided, shows the union (of all) under its subject in the place of dignity. There will be no error. If any do not have confidence in him, let him see to it that (his virtue) be great, long-continued, and firmly correct, and all occasion for repentance will disappear.
  'There is the union (of all) under him in the place of dignity:'--(but) his mind and aim have not yet been brilliantly displayed.
Line 6 6 The topmost SIX, divided, shows its subject sighing and weeping; but there will be no error.
  'He sighs and weeps:'--he does not yet rest in his topmost position.
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