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Yi Jing [I Ching]: The Book of Changes

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Hexagram 36

Míng Yí [Darkening of the Light]

  Original Translation
The Image The light has sunk into the earth.
Kūn (The Receptive, Earth) above, Lí (The Clinging, Fire) below.
The Judgment Míng Yí indicates that (in the circumstances which it denotes) it will be advantageous to realise the difficulty (of the position), and maintain firm correctness.

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(The symbol of) the Earth and that of Brightness entering into the midst of it give the idea of Míng Yí (Brightness wounded or obscured).

The inner (trigram) denotes being accomplished and bright; the outer, being pliant and submissive. The case of king Wăn was that of one who with these qualities was yet involved in great difficulties.

'It will be advantageous to realise the difficulty (of the position), and maintain firm correctness:--that is, (the individual concerned) should obscure his brightness. The case of the count of Kî was that of one who, amidst the difficulties of his House, was able (thus) to maintain his aim and mind correct.

(The trigram representing) the earth and that for the bright (sun) entering within it form Míng Yí. The superior man, in accordance with this, conducts his management of men;--he shows his intelligence by keeping it obscured.
Line 1 The first NINE, undivided, shows its subject, (in the condition indicated by) Míng Yí, flying, but with drooping wings. When the superior man (is revolving) his going away, he may be for three days without eating. Wherever he goes, the people there may speak (derisively of him).
'The superior man (is revolving his) going away:'--(in such a case) he feels it right not to eat.
Line 2 The second SIX, divided, shows its subject, (in the condition indicated by) Míng Yí, wounded in the left thigh. He saves himself by the strength of a (swift) horse; and is fortunate.
'The good fortune of (the subject of) the second SIX, divided,' is due to the proper fashion of his acting according to his circumstances.
Line 3 The third NINE, undivided, shows its subject, (in the condition indicated by) Míng Yí, hunting in the south, and taking the great chief (of the darkness). He should not be eager to make (all) correct (at once).
With the aim represented by 'hunting in the south' a great achievement is accomplished.
Line 4 The fourth SIX, divided, shows its subject (just) entered into the left side of the belly (of the dark land). (But) he is able to carry out the mind appropriate (in the condition indicated by) Míng Yí, quitting the gate and courtyard (of the lord of darkness).
'He has (just) entered into the left side of the belly (of the dark land):'--he is still able to carry out the idea in his (inner) mind.
Line 5 The fifth SIX, divided, shows how the count of Kî fulfilled the condition indicated by Míng Yí. It will be advantageous to be firm and correct.
'With the firm correctness of the count of Kî,' his brightness could not be (quite) extinguished.
Line 6 The sixth SIX, divided, shows the case where there is no light, but (only) obscurity. (Its subject) had at first ascended to (the top of) the sky; his future shall be to go into the earth.
'He had at first ascended to (the top of) the sky:'--he might have enlightened the four quarters of the kingdom. 'His future shall be to go into the earth:'--he has failed to fulfil the model (of a ruler).
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