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Yi Jing [I Ching]: The Book of Changes

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Hexagram 35

Jìn [Progress]

  Original Translation
The Image The sun rises over the earth.
Lí (The Clinging, Fire) above, Kūn (The Receptive, Earth) below.
The Judgment In Jìn we see a prince who secures the tranquillity (of the people) presented on that account with numerous horses (by the king), and three times in a day received at interviews.

Jìn denotes advancing.

(In Jìn we have) the bright (sun) appearing above the earth; (the symbol of) docile submission cleaving to that of the Great brightness; and the weak line advanced and moving above:--all these things give us the idea of 'a prince who secures the tranquillity (of the people), presented on that account with numerous horses (by the king), and three times in a day received at interviews.'

(The trigram representing) the earth and that for the bright (sun) coming forth above it form Jìn. The superior man, according to this, gives himself to make more brilliant his bright virtue.
Line 1 The first SIX, divided, shows one wishing to advance, and (at the same time) kept back. Let him be firm and correct, and there will be good fortune. If trust be not reposed in him, let him maintain a large and generous mind, and there will be no error.
'He appears wishing to advance, but (at the same time) being kept back:'--all-alone he pursues the correct course. 'Let him maintain a large and generous mind, and there will be no error:'--he has not yet received an official charge.
Line 2 The second SIX, divided, shows its subject with the appearance of advancing, and yet of being sorrowful. If he be firm and correct, there will be good fortune. He will receive this great blessing from his grandmother.
'He will receive this great blessing:'--for he is in the central place and the correct position for him.
Line 3 The third SIX, divided, shows its subject trusted by all (around him). All occasion for repentance will disappear.
'All (around) trust him:'--their (common) aim is to move upwards and act.
Line 4 The fourth NINE, undivided, shows its subject with the appearance of advancing, but like a marmot. However firm and correct he may be, the position is one of peril.
'(He advances like) a marmot. However firm and correct he may be, his position is one of peril:'--his place is not that appropriate for him.
Line 5 The fifth SIX, divided, shows how all occasion for repentance disappears (from its subject). (But) let him not concern himself about whether he shall fail or succeed. To advance will be fortunate, and in every way advantageous.
'Let him not concern himself whether he fails or succeeds:'--his movement in advance will afford ground for congratulation.
Line 6 The topmost NINE, undivided, shows one advancing his horns. But he only uses them to punish the (rebellious people of his own) city. The position is perilous, but there will be good fortune. (Yet) however firm and correct he may be, there will be occasion for regret.
'He uses his horns only to punish (the rebellious people of) his city:'--his course of procedure is not yet brilliant.
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